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    Theory (BW OU)

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    Trinitrotoluene
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    Theory (BW OU)

    Post by Trinitrotoluene on Wed Jun 20, 2012 5:34 am

    Theory
    A BW OU RMT by Rick

    np: Theory, by Kazmo



    Introduction
    With Pokemon Black 2 and White 2 coming out in a few days, this team will become obsolete. The advent of new threats such as Keldeo, the new Kyurem formes, and the Sacred Beast formes of the legendary genies will force me to restructure my teams from the ground up to account for their unique abilities. These new threats, alongside the possibility of new hidden abilities, tutor, egg, and level moves, will force me to scrap nearly every team I've made. With that small aside out of the way, it's formally time to introduce Theory, which I am proud to call my most successful team, and the one that fits my playstyle the most out of EVERY team that I have ever posted.

    Theory was made on the principle that heavy offense can be conducted without having to use a weather or dual screens to supplement the sweepers. Another principle Theory was based on was the principle of overloading walls with the presence of multiple sweepers on one side of the spectrum. In OU, the most common physical walls are Ferrothorn, Gliscor, Skarmory, and Forretress. While they're less common, Tentacruel, Jellicent, Donphan, Vaporeon, and Hippowdon make appearances as well. However, no matter what the physical wall is, they can always be beaten by a combination of the 4 physical sweepers and Starmie. In fact, Starmie beats every physical wall mentioned in this intro besides Ferrothorn when placed one versus one against them. A third concept toyed around with is the idea of using boosted priority to take down the opponent without having to save a team slot for a Scarfed Pokemon. The four priority moves on the team (Ice Shard, Mach Punch, ExtremeSpeed, Bullet Punch) can be used to revenge kill every sweeper in OU. With those three concepts in place, I decided to go create the team which would later be called Theory. The name Theory was chosen because it is my favorite techno track by Kazmo, and my favorite techno track overall.


    Team Building
    np: Operation: {Team} Evolution:


    I started out with Cloyster due to its overwhelming speed and power after a Shell Smash. I've also wanted to use Cloyster for quite a while now, so I figured that I would go with it.



    I knew that Cloyster was weak to Stealth Rock, so I decided to enlist the help of a Rapid Spinner. Enter Starmie. Due to its massive Speed, modest Special Attack, modest bulk, and access to Rapid Spin (obviously), it was granted a place on the team.



    Breloom has extremely good type synergy with Cloyster and Breloom. It can beat into many Pokemon that trouble the two, such as Ferrothorn, and they can do the same for Breloom. It also could incapacitate one opponent with Spore, effectively knocking it out.



    Since Espeon and Dragons were a slight problem, Scizor was chosen to deal with both of the problems. Scizor also provided another source of priority for the team to abuse, all while taking care of many conventional sand-based teams with its powerful boosted Bullet Punch and its other attacks.



    The team needed Stealth Rock, and while choosing Tyranitar may conflict with the mantra of not abusing weather that the team wanted to fulfill, keep in mind that none of the team members at present can really abuse the weather besides earning a little chip damage or negating valuable Leftovers recovery. Indeed, Tyranitar's beauty will be explained later.



    The last member of the team had to be one that could take Sun teams on and cut them down to size. Dragonite, AKA Harsha's favorite Pokemon, was perfect for that role. It could set up on many sun sweepers and demolish them with a combination of bulk further enhanced by Multiscale, incredible power, and the ability to outdo its revenge killers with a boosted ExtremeSpeed.

    With that, the team was completed. A few rounds through actual battle, and it turned into a team that my fellow battler Kira Light (who is incredibly talented, by the way) calls "very scary." It's never lost a battle at this state, and I can't be convinced to improve on it with the advent of B2W2. However, as of now, I can surely be proud to call it my best and most reliable team. Logs:

    Kira Light: This team is way too scary. AHHHHHH.
    Kira Light: /me runs.

    Importable
    Code:
    Starmie @ Leftovers
    Trait: Natural Cure
    EVs: 252 SAtk / 4 SDef / 252 Spd
    Timid Nature (+Spd, -Atk)
    - Hydro Pump
    - Psychic
    - Thunderbolt
    - Rapid Spin

    Cloyster (F) @ King's Rock
    Trait: Skill Link
    EVs: 168 HP / 252 Atk / 88 Spd
    Adamant Nature (+Atk, -SAtk)
    - Shell Smash
    - Icicle Spear
    - Rock Blast
    - Ice Shard

    Breloom (F) @ Toxic Orb
    Trait: Poison Heal
    EVs: 236 HP / 224 Atk / 24 SDef / 24 Spd
    Adamant Nature (+Atk, -SAtk)
    - Spore
    - Swords Dance
    - Mach Punch
    - Seed Bomb

    Tyranitar (F) @ Focus Sash
    Trait: Sand Stream
    EVs: 56 Atk / 200 SAtk / 252 Spd
    Hasty Nature (+Spd, -Def)
    - Stealth Rock
    - Crunch
    - Fire Blast
    - Roar

    Dragonite (F) @ Lum Berry
    Trait: Multiscale
    EVs: 252 Atk / 4 Def / 252 Spd
    Adamant Nature (+Atk, -SAtk)
    - Dragon Dance
    - Outrage
    - Fire Punch
    - ExtremeSpeed

    Scizor (F) @ Lum Berry
    Trait: Technician
    EVs: 148 HP / 252 Atk / 108 Spd
    Adamant Nature (+Atk, -SAtk)
    - Swords Dance
    - Bullet Punch
    - Bug Bite
    - Brick Break

    The Team at a Glance





    The Team in Detail


    Starmie @ Leftovers | Natural Cure
    Timid Nature | 252 SpA / 4 SpD / 252 Spe | 0 Atk
    Hydro Pump | Psychic / Thunder Wave | Thunderbolt | Rapid Spin


    As mentioned earlier, Starmie is this team's Rapid Spinner, and it's one of the most important members of the team, seeing that two members are weak to Stealth Rock. However, not all is lost if it fails to spin hazards away. In the OU usage statistics, the most common special walls are Dragonite, Heatran, Tyranitar, and Jirachi. Every one of these walls is prime set-up bait for at least one of the four sweepers present on the team. Hydro Pump is Starmie's main STAB move, dealing a consistent amount of damage to just about every Pokemon that isn't resistant or immune to it, and in the rain, which my opponents can so kindly supply, it can tear apart some Pokemon that resist it. The second moveslot is a toss-up between Psychic and Thunder Wave. Both moves have their usefulness. Psychic is excellent STAB that isn't affected by the weather out on the field. However, Thunder Wave has been tested over Psychic to ease the difficulty in dealing with threats such as the Lati twins, Terrakion, Tornadus, and Rotom-W, which can outspeed the sweepers in the team and give them a bad time. Thunderbolt is a reliable secondary STAB move that ensures the team that Skarmory and other Electric-weak Pokemon won't disrupt the offensive momentum that the team wants and needs. Rapid Spin gets rid of hazards, and combined with Starmie's incredible offensive prowess, keeps stall on its toes. The EVs are standard fare, and the IVs minimize confusion damage. Leftovers were chosen over Life Orb due to the fact that Starmie, being the team's spinner, wants some durability.

    Despite Starmie being in the lead spot in Team Preview, it's almost never chosen to lead the team. It's just in the lead position to lure out Pokemon such as Rotom-W and Tornadus, which Tyranitar can easily set Stealth Rock up on. That will be discussed in greater depth later on. Later on, in the mid-game, Starmie is used to spin hazards that trouble the team away, to further facilitate the switches that go on. From there, it can also paralyze threats, such as those spoken about above, so the team has an easier time against them. During the mid-game, Starmie is also used as a pivot so the team can switch about easier. Should its health dip enough, it'll be used as death fodder so another sweeper can come in and exploit the switch they'll ultimately force. If Starmie somehow survives and reaches the late-game, it can be used to tie up some loose knots, such as weakened Pokemon. Should the opponent's team revolve around rain, then Starmie's role changes just slightly. It'll take a more aggressive role as a counter to various rain sweepers, such as Tornadus, Gyarados, and Feraligatr, while serving as a spinner.


    Cloyster () @ King's Rock | Skill Link
    Adamant Nature | 168 HP / 252 Atk / 88 Spe
    Shell Smash | Icicle Spear | Rock Blast | Ice Shard


    Cloyster is the first of four set-up sweepers present on the team. It's easily the most powerful among them, and is also the main Dragon killer on the team. Its massive physical bulk makes several common Pokemon charged with important positions on a team, such as Landorus, Gliscor, Donphan, and Dugtrio, set-up fodder for this unassuming leviathan. Its own Ice-type STAB and access to a Skill Link-buffed Rock Blast are more than enough to force switches, which give it prime set-up opportunities. Shell Smash is Cloyster's primary set-up move. After one Shell Smash, it reaches 634 Attack and 396 Speed. This gives it more than enough power and speed to barrel through most of the OU tier. Icicle Spear is Cloyster's main STAB, easily breaking most of OU into pieces. Also, since it's a multi-hit move, Sturdy, Multiscale, and Focus Sash do nothing to stop the damage that it does. Rock Blast, while obtaining similar coverage, is needed due to its ability to hit most Pokemon resistant to Icicle Spear for neutral damage. Ice Shard is used to compensate for Cloyster's somewhat reduced Speed. It still has tremendous power behind it, being able to OHKO targets such as Latios after being boosted. The EVs allow Cloyster to hit the aforementioned stats while retaining some ability to survive physical attacks before the boost. The King's Rock gives Cloyster a chance to muscle past some physical walls, such as Skarmory and Jellicent, due to the 41% chance of a flinch when using its multi-hit moves.

    Depending on the type of team present, Cloyster plays itself out a little differently. If an opposing non-weather offensive team is being faced, then Cloyster can be used in one of several ways. If the opposing offensive team carries a Cloyster counter such as Jirachi or Heatran, then Cloyster will be kept in reserve until the other team members have eliminated them. From there, it will set itself up and proceed to go to town on the opponent. If a sun team is being faced, Cloyster can set itself up on any support components they might have and go to town on them. Due to its access to Ice Shard, not even Venusaur, sun's premier Chlorophyll sweeper, can revenge kill it, as Ice Shard is a clean OHKO after Stealth Rock and / or Life Orb recoil. When a rain team is faced, Cloyster will do the same as if it was facing a non-weather offensive team. For Sand offense, Cloyster can set itself up on Landorus and proceed to wreck the opposition. If a Scarfed Terrakion comes out to revenge kill Cloyster (not likely, since the standard Cloyster actually outspeeds Scarfed Terrakion), Cloyster will simply use Ice Shard as the killing blow is delivered. Depending on the move used, the next sweeper will be chosen to pick up the pieces that Cloyster dropped. Hail is generally left to the rest of the team. If a stall team is faced, Cloyster can be used to either wall-break or sweep in the endgame, depending on the team members.


    Breloom () @ Toxic Orb | Poison Heal
    Adamant Nature | 236 HP / 224 Atk / 24 SpD / 24 Spe
    Spore | Swords Dance | Mach Punch | Seed Bomb


    Breloom is the second of four set-up sweepers present on the team, and it's one of the deadliest on the team. Breloom's STAB moves in conjunction with its access to Spore, the only sleep-inducing move with perfect accuracy, and a massive base 130 Attack only serve to further enhance its deadliness. It turns the common Rotom-W and Ferrothorn, normally seen as scourges for offensive teams, into set-up fodder for its powerful attacks. The only Pokemon keen on switching in on Breloom is Xatu, which is beaten down or turned into set-up fodder by several other members of the team. Spore is Breloom's main selling point, being able to potentially incapacitate one member of the opponent's team with no cost to itself. Swords Dance doubles Breloom's already massive Attack stat, making its attacks sting much harder. Mach Punch quickly knocks out Terrakion, Lucario, and other Fighting-weak Pokemon looking to get a quick kill on Breloom. Seed Bomb is Breloom's other STAB move, getting reliable damage on many Pokemon. It also allows Breloom to break apart the JelliThorn core often seen on stall teams. The EVs look weird, but they work incredibly well. The HP EVs maximize Poison Heal recovery, while the Attack EVs allow Breloom to reach 774 Attack after a Swords Dance, which is more than enough to demolish the opposition. The Special Defense EVs allow Breloom to switch in on special attacks more easily, while the Speed EVs allow Breloom to outspeed max speed Timid Wobbuffet, allowing Breloom to incapacitate it with Spore and set up from there. It also allows Breloom to get some free damage on Wobbuffet. Toxic Orb forces the activation of Poison Heal, granting Breloom a semi-immunity to status.

    Breloom is used mainly as a cleaner and revenge killer of sorts. Very rarely will Breloom be used to initiate a sweep. However, most sand teams allow Breloom to do just that. Due to Breloom's auspicious resistances, it can come in on attacks such as Terrakion's Stone Edge or Landorus's Earthquake and start sweeping from there. The switches it forces in conjunction with careful usage of Spore allow it maximum reign over an opposing sand team. Since Mach Punch isn't listed as a main option, people tend to switch in their Terrakion and Mamoswine, looking to get a quick kill on Breloom, only to be snipped with Mach Punch. This gives more insurance to the rest of the team. Since most of the team has set-up moves, Unaware Quagsire is a large problem for them to deal with. Thankfully, its one weakness is carried by Breloom, which can easily deal with it.


    Tyranitar () @ Focus Sash | Sand Stream
    Hasty Nature | 56 Atk / 200 SpA / 252 Spe
    Stealth Rock | Crunch | Fire Blast | Roar


    Tyranitar is the Stealth Rock inducer for the team. Its typing made it ideal for the team, despite aggravating several weaknesses already present on the team. Due to Tyranitar's powerful Dark STAB, the only Pokemon with Magic Bounce will be hesitant to switch in on it. Its power is also great in forcing switches, which further helps the team out when it comes to scoring KOs on the opponent. Its ability, Sand Stream, helps the team immensely by removing the weather other teams rely upon. Stealth Rock helps the sweepers of the team earn KOs they normally wouldn't be able to earn. Crunch punishes those Pokemon with Magic Bounce that have the audacity to switch in on it. Fire Blast roasts Ferrothorn and Skarmory, two common switch-ins for Heatran, reducing the problems they might give the team. Roar messes up Baton Pass-based teams, resetting the boosts they may have acquired, and punishes Pokemon that think of Tyranitar as set-up bait, such as Terrakion and Lucario. The EV spread helps Tyranitar on the offensive end of the spectrum and add to the pressure that it exerts on the battlefield. While the Hasty Nature may be questioned at first, keep in mind that Tyranitar is on this team only to check other weather teams and lay Stealth Rock down, and wasn't meant to have too much defense in its backbone. The Focus Sash guarantees that Tyranitar gets Stealth Rock down on Turn 1, unless Taunt is used against it.

    More often than not, Tyranitar leads the team. Its reliability in getting Stealth Rock down is crucial for this team's success. The extra 12% that Stealth Rock shaves off is beneficial in forcing KOs that would normally have been avoided. In the early game, Tyranitar lays Stealth Rock and disrupts the strategies of the opponent. Later on in the game, Tyranitar can act as sleep and death fodder for the rest of the team, all while changing the weather on the field. While the team doesn't exactly care what weather is out on the field, having sand up makes dealing with weather-dependent sweepers, such as Tornadus, Venusaur, Toxicroak, and Sawsbuck, much easier to deal with. As the battle progresses, Tyranitar is used as death fodder so the offensive momentum the team needs can be preserved.


    Dragonite () @ Lum Berry | Multiscale
    Adamant Nature | 252 Atk / 4 Def / 252 Spe
    Dragon Dance | Outrage | Fire Punch | ExtremeSpeed


    Dragonite is the third sweeper in this team. Its typing, coupled with Multiscale, enables it to take on opposing rain and sun teams almost single-handedly. After one Dragon Dance, the power of its Outrage is enough to 2HKO some notable resists, such as offensive Heatran (after Stealth Rock damage), Lucario, and CB Scizor (after Stealth Rock damage). That same power allows Dragonite to combat several common components of stall, such as Skarmory and Forretress. Dragonite is also the team's main answer to Scizor, who would otherwise terrorize the team with its powerful Bullet Punch. Dragon Dance is Dragonite's best boosting move, augmenting its already massive Attack and modest Speed. Outrage is Dragonite's main STAB move, and one that will at least 2HKO everything that doesn't resist it after a boost. Fire Punch maims Scizor and other Steels not named Heatran. ExtremeSpeed allows Dragonite to flit past any potential revenge killers that will attempt to use their priority to eliminate Dragonite. The EVs are the standard 252 / 4 / 252, which maximizes Dragonite's offensive potential. The Lum Berry gives Dragonite a pseudo-immunity to status, making it easier to set itself up, and if the Lum Berry hasn't been consumed, then Dragonite gets 4-6 turns of Outrage.

    Since Dragonite is weak to Stealth Rock, it's kept in reserve until the hazards have been cleared from the field. For most battles, Dragonite is often the one that starts revving the killing engine that aims to overload the opponent's physical walls with sheer power. Outrage is sheer destruction against most weather teams that try to face down this team. Once Dragonite has done its job, the rest of the team can move along. Oftentimes, the next sweeper can be determined by the move used to kill off Dragonite, and each of the other three sweepers can exploit the weaknesses Dragonite possesses. If the opponent opted to kill off Dragonite with a Rock-type attack (often seen on Pokemon such as Terrakion), then Breloom can quickly exploit that and start to abuse Spore and its powerful STAB. If an Ice-type attack is used, then Cloyster or Scizor can take the field to start cleaning up. If a Dragon-type attack is used, then Scizor can simply use the attack to set itself up. If another sweeper starts to mess up the opponent's team and is KOed while doing just that, Dragonite can pick up the slack, oftentimes finishing the battle. As mentioned before, Dragonite can take on and take down opposing rain and sun teams almost by itself.


    Scizor () @ Lum Berry | Technician
    Adamant Nature | 148 HP / 252 Atk / 108 Spe
    Swords Dance | Bullet Punch | Bug Bite | Brick Break


    Scizor is the fourth sweeper of this team, and is the main scourge against hail that this team has. Its powerful priority is enough to keep many giants in OU, such as Gengar, Terrakion, Alakazam, and Tornadus, from wreaking havoc on the team. Its power after a Swords Dance is enough to clean up and break through any OU team once its counters are eliminated. Due to its access to the Steel type, it's this team's only Dragon resist. However, that's not too much of a problem for this team to deal with, because of Cloyster and Dragonite. Due to its below-average speed, it benefits enormously if Starmie is running Thunder Wave over Psychic. This allows it to use its more powerful STAB on them instead of Bullet Punch. Swords Dance is Scizor's obligatory boosting move, raising its Attack stat through the roof. Bullet Punch is Scizor's main STAB move, easily picking off faster weakened Pokemon not named Magnezone or Gyarados. After a Swords Dance, Scizor's Bullet Punch can actually start to pick apart some Pokemon with a notable Steel resistance, such as Volcarona, Starmie, and Jolteon. Bug Bite is Scizor's strongest STAB move, and sees use against paralyzed or slower targets, such as Reuniclus and Slowbro. Brick Break sees use almost exclusively against teams that rely on dual screens to function successfully. It's also used to fish for Magneton, Magnezone, and Heatran if they're seen on the opponent's team. The EVs let Scizor outspeed the standard Specially Defensive Heatran (248 HP / 252 SpD / 8 Spe) while maintaining some semblance of durability. Meanwhile, the 252 EVs in Attack maximize Scizor's power. The Lum Berry lets Scizor set up on top of Pokemon such as Jirachi.

    Scizor's roles vary immensely depending on the type of team being faced. Normally, when facing Hail teams, Scizor will lead, confident that Heatran will shy away from the lead position due to Starmie being present there. With its STABs and Brick Break, it can easily run through many elements of a hail team. Kyurem and Abomasnow, two of the most common offensive members of a hail team, are broken by Bullet Punch and Brick Break. The only semi-common hail element that Scizor can't easily get past on its own is Tentacruel, and it can be eliminated by teammates. As mentioned in the Team Building section, Scizor is one of the main weapons used against sand teams. It, alongside Breloom, keeps sand teams in check A boosted Bullet Punch really does do a number to many common members of a sand team, such as Landorus and Tyranitar. Since many sand teams choose to pack Reuniclus, a boosted Bug Bite can do Reuniclus in without too much wasted effort. Offensive teams that carelessly lack a Steel-type resistance while opting not to use Dragonite are setting themselves up for disaster, due to the power behind a Technician-boosted Bullet Punch coming from a +2 Scizor, which can easily sweep through OU. This rule applies double to Baton Pass chains, which can't afford to lose any members of their chain, lest they lose all of their boosts. This just goes to show the importance of Scizor for this team.


    One Last Glance at the Team





    Closing Comments

    As Alexander Gaidar of the History's Strongest Disciple Kenichi series once mentioned, "Art is wonderful." The metagame we've ended up with just before the start of Pokemon Black 2 and White 2 was an incredible work of art that we will have to paint over to make room for the new masterpiece that will come with the new Pokemon games. With that aside, I'd like to thank everyone that has battled this team. The experience has helped me fine-tune it into the killing machine it is today. Now, I unfortunately must retire this team to make room for the threats that will come with the new Pokemon games.

    Now that my final competitive team for the original BW era has been posted, I think it's time I did a shout-out in text form. To my two [unofficial] tutees, Harsha and Kira Light, it's been a massive amount of fun talking and teaching competitive Pokemon to the both of you. Thank you two for being such great students. Since it's almost been three years since I started my administration duties at Treehouse, this is a simple thank you to the regulars and my fellow authorities, for livening up the server almost every day. However, the largest thank you has to go to the server owners JonFreeman, teh vappy, and Trent Donnovich for giving me the opportunity to administrate here in the first place. I hope that I haven't disappointed you in my role as head admin. Have a nice day everyone, and thank you once again for going through this RMT.


    Last edited by Rick on Fri Jun 22, 2012 4:42 am; edited 2 times in total
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    Re: Theory (BW OU)

    Post by Kira Light on Wed Jun 20, 2012 12:46 pm

    Hey, Rick. Very nice team, and thank you for the shout-out. Now, onto my rate.

    I find that your team is slightly weak to Life Orb MixNape. can take out Scizor, Cloyster and Breloom with Overheat, take out Tyranitar with a Close Combat, and Hidden Power Ice can take out Dragonite. Starmie won't like switching into a U-Turn either. Anyways, your main way to deal with it is for Dragonite to come in and use Extremespeed, or to sacrifice something and send Starmie in. The problem is that you can't really take repetitive assaults from Infernape. Also, Sand constantly wears down Dragonite, who loses its great advantage of having Multiscale. Instead of using Lum Berry as item for Dragonite, I'd recommend Leftovers instead, so you can heal the Sand damage taken each turn and preserve Multiscale.


    Since you only have one Steel-type on your team (Scizor), dealing with Dragon-types such as Latios and Haxorus becomes hard to do once Scizor is taken down. To deal with those Dragons, I'd try out Ice Beam over Psychic on Starmie. Thanks to its great speed, it can come in and revenge-kill Dragons. Another change I would recommend is Roost over Brick Break on Scizor. Scizor seems to slightly act as a defensive pivot, having to tank multitudes of Draco Meteors and Outrages. To help its surivability, Roost would be a nice move. It would also allow it to grab an additional Swords Dance boost in a few situations, which would help you sweep through opposing teams. While Brick Break helps deal with Ferrothorn, it won't like tanking a +2 Bug Bite, which is a 2HKO, I believe. You could also try out Roost on Dragonite; however, you would lose coverage.

    That's all for my rant on your very scary team.
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    Re: Theory (BW OU)

    Post by Trinitrotoluene on Wed Jun 20, 2012 2:56 pm

    Kira Light wrote:Hey, Rick. Very nice team, and thank you for the shout-out. Now, onto my rate.

    I find that your team is slightly weak to Life Orb MixNape. can take out Scizor, Cloyster and Breloom with Overheat, take out Tyranitar with a Close Combat, and Hidden Power Ice can take out Dragonite. Starmie won't like switching into a U-Turn either. Anyways, your main way to deal with it is for Dragonite to come in and use Extremespeed, or to sacrifice something and send Starmie in. The problem is that you can't really take repetitive assaults from Infernape. Also, Sand constantly wears down Dragonite, who loses its great advantage of having Multiscale. Instead of using Lum Berry as item for Dragonite, I'd recommend Leftovers instead, so you can heal the Sand damage taken each turn and preserve Multiscale.


    Since you only have one Steel-type on your team (Scizor), dealing with Dragon-types such as Latios and Haxorus becomes hard to do once Scizor is taken down. To deal with those Dragons, I'd try out Ice Beam over Psychic on Starmie. Thanks to its great speed, it can come in and revenge-kill Dragons. Another change I would recommend is Roost over Brick Break on Scizor. Scizor seems to slightly act as a defensive pivot, having to tank multitudes of Draco Meteors and Outrages. To help its surivability, Roost would be a nice move. It would also allow it to grab an additional Swords Dance boost in a few situations, which would help you sweep through opposing teams. While Brick Break helps deal with Ferrothorn, it won't like tanking a +2 Bug Bite, which is a 2HKO, I believe. You could also try out Roost on Dragonite; however, you would lose coverage.

    That's all for my rant on your very scary team.

    Thanks for the rate Kira! While LO MixApe looks like a threat on paper, it really isn't a threat in practice. To deal with it, the team takes advantage of its frailty and the fact that it cannot live through more than one attack. Every sweeper on this team will be able to deal at least 48% to it with their priority move as it switches in, assuming they've boosted at least once. If it does come in on a boosting move, then the sweeper at present (usually Scizor) will use their priority move to get some quick damage on it. However, if it switches in on Cloyster, Cloyster will use Rock Blast to just KO it right then and there.

    Dragons are always fun to face. Since they'll be spamming Draco Meteor and Outrage, it's all a matter of getting the right sweepers in at the right times. Every member of this team has a move that will incapacitate Dragons that will attempt to switch in on them. However, my favorite method of dealing with Dragons is to paralyze them with Starmie, which can live through a Dragon Pulse or a -2 Draco Meteor from Latios and paralyze it with Thunder Wave. It's also faster than the conventional Choiced Dragons that roam the OU metagame, so it can paralyze them with ease. Once they're paralyzed, they're at the mercy of Cloyster, Dragonite, and Scizor. If they try to spam Outrage against Tyranitar, it can simply Roar them out (assuming that its Focus Sash is active). Simply put, I have multiple methods of dealing with Dragons. Thanks for your rate anyways.


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    Re: Theory (BW OU)

    Post by Octillery on Wed Jun 20, 2012 5:27 pm

    This team is very impressive, I have yet to see it in action however from experience there are very few things that could stop this team:
    Trick Room, only if executed well and with a fair amount of luck.
    And, of course, full-on troll teams, the sort with Jirachi, Sigilyph, Whimsicott, etc., and Ditto. Ditto is probably the one Pokemon that you should be weary of more than any other.

    You have also found a balance between hyper-offense and a balanced team, which is, and almost always has been, the key to success.

    However, for Cloyster be very weary of Landorus, which you seemed to indicate would act as set-up bait, as there are, albeit rarely, mixed sets. The Tyranitar set I use is a MixTar with an Expert Belt, to trick my opponent into assuming choice and then I proceed to 6-0 an unprepared team. That can't happen to this team that you've got here, however a Landorus set of Stone Edge, Earthquake, Focus Blast is something to look out for.

    However, I believe that if you continue to use this team, more people will use a mixed Landorus set. When Gen V started, Mienshao was everywhere. People found counters, Mienshao disappeared. Due to the disappearance, counters have gone away too, allowing Mienshao to creep back.

    One last note, how common is Sawsbuck? I know it's a weather-boosted sweeper, but is it really one that needs to be considered first?
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    Re: Theory (BW OU)

    Post by Kira Light on Wed Jun 20, 2012 5:35 pm

    Octillery wrote:This team is very impressive, I have yet to see it in action however from experience there are very few things that could stop this team:
    Trick Room, only if executed well and with a fair amount of luck.
    And, of course, full-on troll teams, the sort with Jirachi, Sigilyph, Whimsicott, etc., and Ditto. Ditto is probably the one Pokemon that you should be weary of more than any other.

    You have also found a balance between hyper-offense and a balanced team, which is, and almost always has been, the key to success.

    However, for Cloyster be very weary of Landorus, which you seemed to indicate would act as set-up bait, as there are, albeit rarely, mixed sets. The Tyranitar set I use is a MixTar with an Expert Belt, to trick my opponent into assuming choice and then I proceed to 6-0 an unprepared team. That can't happen to this team that you've got here, however a Landorus set of Stone Edge, Earthquake, Focus Blast is something to look out for.

    However, I believe that if you continue to use this team, more people will use a mixed Landorus set. When Gen V started, Mienshao was everywhere. People found counters, Mienshao disappeared. Due to the disappearance, counters have gone away too, allowing Mienshao to creep back.

    One last note, how common is Sawsbuck? I know it's a weather-boosted sweeper, but is it really one that needs to be considered first?

    Sawsbuck is 83rd in OU Statistics in May 2012 (used 1.271% of the battles).
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    Re: Theory (BW OU)

    Post by Trinitrotoluene on Wed Jun 20, 2012 6:24 pm

    Octillery wrote:This team is very impressive, I have yet to see it in action however from experience there are very few things that could stop this team:
    Trick Room, only if executed well and with a fair amount of luck.
    And, of course, full-on troll teams, the sort with Jirachi, Sigilyph, Whimsicott, etc., and Ditto. Ditto is probably the one Pokemon that you should be weary of more than any other.

    You have also found a balance between hyper-offense and a balanced team, which is, and almost always has been, the key to success.

    However, for Cloyster be very weary of Landorus, which you seemed to indicate would act as set-up bait, as there are, albeit rarely, mixed sets. The Tyranitar set I use is a MixTar with an Expert Belt, to trick my opponent into assuming choice and then I proceed to 6-0 an unprepared team. That can't happen to this team that you've got here, however a Landorus set of Stone Edge, Earthquake, Focus Blast is something to look out for.

    However, I believe that if you continue to use this team, more people will use a mixed Landorus set. When Gen V started, Mienshao was everywhere. People found counters, Mienshao disappeared. Due to the disappearance, counters have gone away too, allowing Mienshao to creep back.

    One last note, how common is Sawsbuck? I know it's a weather-boosted sweeper, but is it really one that needs to be considered first?

    Thanks for the rate Octillery. I think I did battle you with this team once or twice. That's beside the point though. Now, to get at the threats you've pointed out.

    Trick Room is a strategy that indeed forces me to use unconventional means to defeat. However, against most Trick Room teams, my first move is to sleep one of the members of the team, which can usually be done with ease due to Breloom being faster than most components of Trick Room teams. Since both inducers and sweepers play an important role in Trick Room, I'm guaranteed to incapacitate at least one important member of the opponent's team. From there, as they switch to another inducer / sweeper, Breloom can use Swords Dance to start battering the opponent's team around. A Trick Room Porygon2 (EV spread: 252 HP / 252 SpA / 4 SpD) will take a minimum of 55% from both Seed Bomb and Mach Punch after a Swords Dance. This means that it can't risk setting up in front of Breloom. Reuniclus can't beat Scizor, and most other Trick Room sweepers end up having a bad time against Breloom. Once Trick Room wears off, Dragonite can break through the Trick Room inducers and sweepers with its powerful STAB moves.

    I personally haven't found Ditto to be too much of a problem. The only problems ever encountered when facing a Ditto is if I'm facing a Dream World version of it with Imposter. The full troll teams aren't too bad, especially considering that I have several means of dealing with the members inside.

    Landorus isn't that large a problem for the team. After Stealth Rock damage, Cloyster can OHKO it with an unboosted Ice Shard. Sawsbuck was mentioned because it's one of the more prolific Chlorophyll sweepers.


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    Re: Theory (BW OU)

    Post by Octillery on Wed Jun 20, 2012 6:46 pm

    Rick wrote:
    Octillery wrote:This team is very impressive, I have yet to see it in action however from experience there are very few things that could stop this team:
    Trick Room, only if executed well and with a fair amount of luck.
    And, of course, full-on troll teams, the sort with Jirachi, Sigilyph, Whimsicott, etc., and Ditto. Ditto is probably the one Pokemon that you should be weary of more than any other.

    You have also found a balance between hyper-offense and a balanced team, which is, and almost always has been, the key to success.

    However, for Cloyster be very weary of Landorus, which you seemed to indicate would act as set-up bait, as there are, albeit rarely, mixed sets. The Tyranitar set I use is a MixTar with an Expert Belt, to trick my opponent into assuming choice and then I proceed to 6-0 an unprepared team. That can't happen to this team that you've got here, however a Landorus set of Stone Edge, Earthquake, Focus Blast is something to look out for.

    However, I believe that if you continue to use this team, more people will use a mixed Landorus set. When Gen V started, Mienshao was everywhere. People found counters, Mienshao disappeared. Due to the disappearance, counters have gone away too, allowing Mienshao to creep back.

    One last note, how common is Sawsbuck? I know it's a weather-boosted sweeper, but is it really one that needs to be considered first?

    Thanks for the rate Octillery. I think I did battle you with this team once or twice. That's beside the point though. Now, to get at the threats you've pointed out.

    Trick Room is a strategy that indeed forces me to use unconventional means to defeat. However, against most Trick Room teams, my first move is to sleep one of the members of the team, which can usually be done with ease due to Breloom being faster than most components of Trick Room teams. Since both inducers and sweepers play an important role in Trick Room, I'm guaranteed to incapacitate at least one important member of the opponent's team. From there, as they switch to another inducer / sweeper, Breloom can use Swords Dance to start battering the opponent's team around. A Trick Room Porygon2 (EV spread: 252 HP / 252 SpA / 4 SpD) will take a minimum of 55% from both Seed Bomb and Mach Punch after a Swords Dance. This means that it can't risk setting up in front of Breloom. Reuniclus can't beat Scizor, and most other Trick Room sweepers end up having a bad time against Breloom. Once Trick Room wears off, Dragonite can break through the Trick Room inducers and sweepers with its powerful STAB moves.

    I personally haven't found Ditto to be too much of a problem. The only problems ever encountered when facing a Ditto is if I'm facing a Dream World version of it with Imposter. The full troll teams aren't too bad, especially considering that I have several means of dealing with the members inside.

    Landorus isn't that large a problem for the team. After Stealth Rock damage, Cloyster can OHKO it with an unboosted Ice Shard. Sawsbuck was mentioned because it's one of the more prolific Chlorophyll sweepers.
    I don't recall ever battling against this team. Perhaps I lost so badly that my mind is suppressing the memory.

    I had greatly underestimated Sawsbuck. I thought it was only used in the lower tiers.

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    Re: Theory (BW OU)

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