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    Guide to Volt-Turn Offense

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    harsha
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    Guide to Volt-Turn Offense

    Post by harsha on Thu Feb 02, 2012 10:49 am

    Guide to Volt-Turn Offense
    An OU RMT by Harsha. Hopefully it helps explain Volt-Turn cores a bit, and the offense behind them.

    Introduction
    I actually was not going to build a new team for a while, as I really started to get into the DPPt OU meta game. However, the RMT workshop that was running on Smogon convinced me otherwise, and I decided to go for the gold and try and make my best team yet. Indeed, I wanted to try and give the team raters a hard time! Anyhow, this team has been quite successful for me, and it’s based on abusing Volt-Turn to gain favorable match-ups so that I can proceed to sweep. I have the tools to take down the walls that block sweeps for my team, and I really have to say that I’m quite proud of the turn out. I also must admit that since I began working on a project to build a guide to Volt-Turn, said strategy has appeared on nearly all of my teams. This team is no exception, and it is probably my best submission to the guide that Wario is OSSIM and I have been compiling. Now, with this in mind, I decided to try another aspect of Volt-Turn that wasn’t seen often. I decided that since Gastrodon was one of Volt-Turns biggest enemies, I would try out something that would immediately take Gastrodon out of the match. With that threat out of the way, I decided that other counters to Volt-Turn could all be beaten down with sheer, brute force. Thus, I settled on my sweepers, and everything else just fell into place. I don’t want to bore you with a long, tedious introduction, as it wastes both my time and yours. So, without further ado, here is the teambuilding process!

    Teambuilding Process
    Teambuilding Process:

    First, I decided that I wanted to abuse an offensive core of a specially offensive Politoed, coupled with a Terrakion to take Politoed’s counters out of the way. This led to another decision; what type of Terrakion should I use? I chose not to think about this and moved on to the next few Pokémon.

    After I had Politoed and Terrakion locked in, I decided that I wanted more offensive momentum, coupled with a Grass-type resist (or two). As it stood, Politoed and Terrakion succumbed to Pokémon like Celebi. I decided to try out an uncommon Volt-Turn core, as I didn’t want this team to be one of the most standard ones out there. Thus, I added a never seen Pokémon in OU: Rotom-C. Scizor also provided offensive momentum, as well as the ability to take on Dragons with some relative ease. I added both to the team.

    At this point, I realized that my team would have trouble against the likes of Heatran if Politoed ever went down due to a misplay on my part. I chose a variant of Dragonite that helped me many times in the past, as it dealt with Heatran and offered a multitude of resistances to further benefit my team.

    With a weather base, two physical powerhouses, and a Volt-Turn core, I realized that my team was lacking. I really was quite unsure of what would fit my team optimally, so I decided to test out Mamoswine. At this point, I thought the team was ready to go, as I now had a reliable Stealth Rock user to compliment my heavily offensive team. Also, Mamoswine gave me a Volt Switch absorber, and stopped Thunder spam.

    At this point, the team was completed. I felt pretty good when I took it out for a spin, and I was pretty proud of it. However, when I took to the ladders to test, I got to the 1200s with ease, but I could never climb higher. I thought that Dragonite was not pulling its weight, so I decided to replace him for another Pokémon: Latios.

    At that point, the team functioned much better, losing only to bad hax, which occurs a lot with my luck. Anyhow, the team has been able to break through cores that used to give it trouble due to the presence of Latios and Terrakion. The team got into some hot water after I realized Latios had no access to beating Ferrothorn reliably, so I decided to scrap him in favor of Hydreigon. Mamoswine was also under-performing, so I decided upon Skarmory to fix my lack of Stealth Rock issue.


    At a Glance

    |||||||

    A Closer Look


    Politoed @ Leftovers | Drizzle
    Modest Nature | 248 HP / 252 SpA / 8 Spe
    Hydro Pump | Focus Blast | Ice Beam | Perish Song

    This is actually the Politoed set that I posted, which eventually made it on-site. Though it has neither the speed of Choice Scarf Toed, the defenses of defensive Toed, nor the power of Specs Toed, 3 Attacks Politoed makes up for this with its many outstanding qualities. The first is Politoed’s ability to switch moves. Since Politoed can switch moves, it gains the ability to adapt to the situation without giving the opponent a free turn—which could mean the entire match. Politoed’s power may seem compromised by the lack of Choice Specs, but I assure you, this is really no problem; it is offset by Leftovers recovery, bulk, and the ability to switch moves. Also, Politoed still hits hard even without Specs, as it OHKOs Conkeldurr and Scizor in the rain with Stealth Rock support.

    Politoed’s Hydro Pump is the move I will usually spam, as it hits everything hard due to STAB and rain support. Even against things like Tyranitar, I can usually do enough damage to force switches. If I am able to get a favorable match-up, it is likely credit to Politoed’s great power. Ice Beam is used when the opponent throws a Dragonite at me, and I need it gone as fast as possible. Dragonite is a huge threat to nearly every team nowadays, and Ice Beam ensures that it doesn’t get too out of hand. Focus Blast is a good coverage move for catching Ferrothorn and Tyranitar on the switch. However, it usually doesn’t get any other use, as Hydro Pump is just so powerful, and it has decent accuracy. Perish Song is used whenever an opponent is trying to set up on Politoed, and it works well late game too when I just need to ensure that the opponent dies within three turns.

    The EVs maximize Politoed’s power, which is important because I want to blow holes right through the opponent’s team. 248 EVs are invested in HP as opposed to 252 because it ensures that I get an extra switch-in on hazards. The HP EVs also give Politoed workable bulk, which is important. Politoed can absorb a U-turn from standard Choice Band Scizor, and then try to dismantle to projected switch-in. Also, it should actually OHKO Scizor, but obviously Hydro Pump’s accuracy has to be taken into account. Regardless, I can abuse the high-powered moves only because Politoed has the bulk to live through hits. Politoed’s weather is necessary for this team because it reduces many weaknesses and promotes Thunder’s accuracy. Of course, this team would have to undergo a complete overhaul if Politoed was absent.

    Synergy:
    : Rotom-C, Hydreigon, Scizor
    : Rotom-C, Hydreigon


    Terrakion @ Leftovers | Justified
    Adamant Nature | 252 Atk / 4 Def / 252 Spe
    Substitute | Swords Dance | Close Combat | Stone Edge

    Substitute + Swords Dance Terrakion is a force to be reckoned with. Though it does not have the immediate power or speed of the Choice sets, and it lacks the ability to boost according to the situation, it makes up for that because of how easy it can set up. With a Substitute, Terrakion avoids status, and it can use its doppelganger to avoid revenge kills. Terrakion also offers a very solid offensive presence, as it 2HKOs the likes of Deoxys-D and others when boosted. Given that this is probably Terrakion’s best set, I copied the moves from New World Order’s on-site set, so the credit does not belong to me.

    Terrakion with a sub up is downright fearsome. Not only does it help nab momentum—an important factor of gameplay for offensive teams—but it also helps Terrakion nab Swords Dance boosts. Obviously, Swords Dance boosts Terrakion’s power through the roof, and is obligatory on this set. Close Combat and Stone Edge together provide amazing coverage, and are the only moves that Terrakion needs to successfully rip through teams. Close Combat OHKOs Scizor after reaching +2, so it is obviously nothing to laugh about. Both moves are obligatory STAB anyways, so it’s not really like I would have chosen anything else. With Substitute and coverage, not even Terrakion’s primary checks have the ability to safely switch in. Seriously, I don’t understand why it took so long to come up with this set; it’s easily the MVP of this team.

    The EVs are standard, and they maximize both Terrakion’s swiftness and power. However, I went with an jolly nature to maximize Terrakion’s speed. Leftovers is used over Rock Gem or Life Orb because I wanted survivability; Terrakion is easily the most valuable member of this team, and I want to preserve it. Leftovers also helps me heal after setting up subs, so I don’t have to keep losing HP each time I set a sub up.

    Synergy:
    : Scizor, Rotom-C, Hydreigon, Skarmory
    : Politoed, Rotom-C, Hydreigon
    : Scizor, Skarmory and Politoed can take a hit
    : Scizor, Hydreigon
    : Rotom-C, Politoed, Scizor
    : Hydreigon, Rotom-C


    Rotom-C @ Choice Scarf | Levitate
    Modest Nature | 252 SpA / 4 SpD / 252 Spe
    Leaf Storm | Volt Switch | Thunder | Hidden Power Ice

    Rotom-C is one of the most underrated Rotom formes out there. Though it has weaknesses to three common move types, it is highly effective for this team. I chose Rotom-C over other scouts like Jolteon, Rotom-W, and Pokémon of that sort because Rotom-C offered many important resistances. Also, it offered a reliable way of taking on many of Volt-Turn’s common counters, and it should never be disregarded while building a team. Rotom-C resists many types that would cause my team trouble otherwise; namely, these include Grass, Water, Electric, and Steel.

    The moveset is standard for the most part, so I won’t delve into too much depth. Leaf Storm is primary STAB that is used to hit hard and then get out. Though the -2 drop in special attack seems devastating, like I stated above, it’s used to hit hard, and then I get out. Thunder gets perfect accuracy in the rain, and it also has a 30% paralysis rate. Thunder also hits like a truck, and I can spam it as soon as the opposing Ground-types are all out of play. Volt Switch is used to scout, and it is the reason that Rotom-C is part one of the Volt-Turn core. It gets me out of sticky situations with Blissey and company, and it allows me to gain momentum for the team. Hidden Power Ice is used because it allows me to hit Dragonite, Salamence, and other Dragon- or Grass-types hard. However, I’m considering dropping it for Trick because it eases times with stall.

    The EVs are standard, as usual. They give me maximum speed while capitalizing on Rotom-A’s 105 base special attack. Modest nature effectively boosts my ability to hit hard, which is always important. Levitate provides opportunities for switch-ins because it allows me to capitalize on Terrakion’s Ground weakness. Since Rotom-C is Choice-locked, I have to be weary of what is on the opponent’s team. However, this is usually not a problem, given my experience with Volt-Turn.

    Synergy:
    : Politoed, Terrakion, Hydreigon
    : Terrakion, Mamoswine (Who uses Poison-type moves anyways?)
    : Scizor, Terrakion
    : Politoed, Scizor


    Scizor @ Choice Band | Technician
    Adamant Nature | 248 HP / 52 Atk / 208 SpD
    Bullet Punch | U-turn | Superpower | Pursuit

    Scizor has quickly become a staple on all Volt-Turn teams due to its amazing resistances and only one weakness. Also, Scizor has access to useful priority, and it has a decent amount of bulk to use. I chose a Choice Band set over the Swords Dance set because it completed my Volt-Turn core and allowed me to switch with reckless abandon. Obviously, Scizor packs a lot of power. It was the most used Pokémon in the December 2011 usage statistics for good reason, after all.

    This is actually another standard moveset. Choice Band Scizor packs a lot of power, so I decided to abuse it with its arsenal of high-powered moves. Bullet Punch is a reliable STAB priority attack that is useful for finishing off weakened foes. It is also used if I see a Terrakion on the opposing player’s field. Superpower is a very strong move, and it takes down things like Blissey with ease. Of course, I need to watch for errant Blissey’s that run Flamethrower, but with rain support, even that is no problem. U-turn is the most obvious move on the set because it helps Scizor make up part two of my Volt-Turning core. It’s there to preserve offensive momentum, and it also hits extremely hard. Pursuit is used to catch fleeing Pokémon like Gengar, Latios, Latias, and Alakazam. However, Bullet Punch is usually the better option on the above Pokémon.

    Instead of following the standard Choice Band Scizor’s EVs, I went with a more specially defensive spread. This spread helps me take Draco Meteors and Hidden Power Fires from opposing Pokémon, and it allows me to hit with decent power and the ability to usually KO back. Scizor still gets the kills it is needed for, so the lack of investment is no problem. The adamant nature also helps with power issues. Technician is a cool ability because it increases Pursuit and Bullet Punch’s power, as they are both under 60 base power. Scizor, even with a weaker spread, still remains one of the most fearsome Pokémon in the BW OU meta game.

    Synergy:
    : Politoed, Terrakion, Hydreigon


    Hydreigon @ Leftovers | Levitate
    Modest Nature | 252 SpA / 4 SpD / 252 Spe
    Substitute | Dragon Pulse | Focus Blast | Surf

    Hydreigon with a Substitute can be downright fearsome when brought in at the right moment. It has decent bulk, and it can set up on a majority of the slower Pokémon in the BW OU meta game. When Ferrothorn or Forretress are setting up Spikes on my side, Hydreigon is my immediate answer. It also can come in on resisted moves and do a lot of damage because it has pretty decent bulk. In fact, it's been a large player in the team's latest success.

    The moveset is fairly self-explanatory, since most of these are Hydreigon's best choices. Dragon Pulse is the main STAB that I can spam until a Steel-type comes in, or something of that sort. However, with rain support, Hydreigon does more damage with Surf than Dragon Pulse, so that's also another good choice. I chose not to use Fire Blast or Flamethrower because I didn't want to use a move neutered by the main weather. Focus Blast is one of the main selling points of this set, as it has the coverage to hit Ferrothorn and Tyranitar very hard. Also, the additional (and lucky) drop in special defense can be hazardous for people trying to switch in their Blisseys expecting to sponge hits. Substitute is the crux of this, as it avoids status, revenge-killers, and all of those things.

    The EVs maximize special attack and speed, which are all Hydreigon has a need for. Also, the modest nature ensures that I hit harder than I would with a speed enhancing nature. Leftovers are necessary because they add to longevity, which is important because I'm using Substitute. Levitate provides ample switch-ins on Earthquakes, and it avoids Spikes and Toxic Spikes residual damage.

    Synergy:
    : Politoed, Scizor
    : Scizor, Politoed can take a hit
    : Scizor and Skarmory can take hits
    : Scizor, Terrakion


    Skarmory @ Leftovers | Sturdy
    Impish Nature | 252 HP / 184 Def / 72 Spe
    Brave Bird | Stealth Rock | Whirlwind | Taunt

    This big bird makes up the main defensive backbone of the team. It works well against sweepers such as double priority Lucario, Terrakion, and stuff like that. I can either lead with Skarmory to set up hazards early on, or I can use it later with a switch from my Volt-Turn core. Skarmory performs its job much better than Mamoswine could because of how bulky it is. Also, Skarmory can effectively shut down opposing sand teams, which is a huge boon for this team.

    The moveset is my best bet against boosting sweepers, as well as Ferrothorn and those types of threats. Taunt screws Ferrothorn over, as it can barely damage Skarmory. I use Stealth Rock because it's a required move for most offensive teams. After I get Stealth Rock up, I can usually spam Whirlwind to weaken opponent's Dragonites or Volcaronas if I get the chance. Brave Bird is for weakened foes like Lucario after they have used Close Combat or something like that. It also hits fairly hard. I have to watch out for the drop in HP, though. It also prevents Skarmory from becoming Taunt bait.

    Skarmory's EVs and nature are standard, as they allow it to outspeed threats and take lots of physical hits. Dragon-types have a hard time blowing through Skarmory because its defenses are so high. Sturdy is the ability of choice so that I can get Stealth Rock up in a back-to-the-wall situation. Anyhow, Skarmory's other abilities don't do much. Leftovers are the ability of choice because I can turn 2HKOs into 3HKOs, and so on.

    Synergy:
    : Politoed, Hydreigon, Terrakion
    : Hydreigon, Rotom-C

    Importable

    Code:

    Politoed (F) @ Leftovers
    Trait: Drizzle
    EVs: 248 HP / 252 SAtk / 8 Spd
    Modest Nature (+SAtk, -Atk)
    - Hydro Pump
    - Ice Beam
    - Focus Blast
    - Perish Song

    Terrakion @ Leftovers
    Trait: Justified
    EVs: 252 Atk / 4 Def / 252 Spd
    Jolly Nature (+Spd, -SAtk)
    - Substitute
    - Swords Dance
    - Stone Edge
    - Close Combat

    Rotom-C @ Choice Scarf
    Trait: Levitate
    EVs: 252 SAtk / 4 SDef / 252 Spd
    Modest Nature (+SAtk, -Atk)
    - Leaf Storm
    - Thunder
    - Volt Switch
    - Hidden Power [Ice]

    Scizor (M) @ Choice Band
    Trait: Technician
    EVs: 248 HP / 52 Atk / 208 SDef
    Adamant Nature (+Atk, -SAtk)
    - Bullet Punch
    - Superpower
    - U-turn
    - Pursuit

    Skarmory (F) @ Leftovers
    Trait: Sturdy
    EVs: 252 HP / 184 Def / 72 Spd
    Bold Nature (+Def, -Atk)
    - Brave Bird
    - Taunt
    - Whirlwind
    - Stealth Rock

    Hydreigon (M) @ Leftovers
    Trait: Levitate
    EVs: 252 SAtk / 4 SDef / 252 Spd
    Modest Nature (+SAtk, -Atk)
    - Substitute
    - Dragon Pulse
    - Surf
    - Focus Blast
     
    Playstyle
    First off, I need to get this out of the way. My synergy may seem off, but that is for a reason. I don’t rely on synergy; rather, I rely on setting up before the opponent does. This is how I win games, and is important for anybody who is willing to try out the team.

    Now, before I conclude this, I would like to share my playstyle of this team first, as it differs from conventional knowledge. I play kind of differently from most people, in other words. When looking at the team preview, I try and judge what Pokémon the opponent is using. For example, if the opponent is using a Deoxys-D, I’ll usually aim for a set up. If the opponent uses another weather, Terrakion is my best bet against it. If the opponent is using rain as well, I’ll lead with something that will give me an early lead (usually Rotom-C). Though this might sound conventional, I’ll diverge from here.

    Usually, I try and gain momentum by setting up early with Terrakion to nab a bunch of KOs. When the opponent is weakened and finally threatens Terrakion, I will just sac it, as I know I can win regardless of Terrakion’s presence. Politoed will usually come out, if it had not made a prior appearance. With Politoed’s power, many people are often surprised to see it KO so many Pokémon with such ease. In fact, Politoed deals over 50% damage to a standard Choice Scarf Rotom-W. With Politoed’s presence, and usually no opposing weather alive, I am free to make a few decisions. I can either set up Stealth Rock if the opponent is weak to Rock-types, or I can aim to grab momentum with my Volt-Turn core.

    After grabbing the momentum, it is usually time to sweep with Hydreigon (given that I have not already won or lost). Hydreigon can set up on anything that tries to harm it with status. Of course, if the opponent sports a massive weakness to Hydreigon, I can always lead with it. When that is complete, the game is usually over.

    Given this playstyle, how do I deal with…

    Stall: Stall is my toughest foe, and it carries a lot of Volt-Turn’s worst enemies. Given that, I usually lead with Terrakion, and then I try and start something up from there. Sandstorms that Hippowdon and Tyranitar help me in this case because I can boost Terrakion’s Special Defense stat. Skarmory can handle stall as well.

    Sun: Sun is easily the easiest foe to face. Though Ninetales takes a pittance from my Volt-Turn core, I can easily set up with Terrakion and sweep. It doesn’t help that Politoed beats Ninetales one on one.

    Sand: Terrakion beats these teams, but Volt-Turn helps a lot here. I have to make sure I have rain up before I send out Latios, though. I don’t want to continue losing HP after subbing because of sand. Skarmory takes on most sand sweepers.

    Rain: Opposing rain is not too bad because Rotom-C is so effective against it. Hydreigon can also fit this role. That’s my main line of defense, and there isn’t much else to say here.

    Hail: Say hello to Terrakion and Scizor! Seriously, Hail cannot touch this team.

    Conclusion
    Anyhow, in conclusion, I’d like to thank a few people. First off, I would like to thank the Smogon community for both hosting the RMT workshop that led to the creation of this team and helping me out in the past with my teams. Secondly, I would like to thank Wario is OSSIM for aiding me in the writing of our article. He also helps me test out teams on a regular basis, and deserves a lot of credit for tutoring me in competitive battling. Finally, I’d like to thank PLDH.net and Smogon for the images found throughout the RMT. Anyhow, please, go on and rate or comment! All feedback is appreciated, and I hope you had fun reading through. Obviously, if you took the time to read through the whole thing, your patience is appreciated; this is by far the longest RMT I have ever written. Thanks again!


    Last edited by Harsha on Sat Feb 04, 2012 12:31 pm; edited 7 times in total
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    Roxie
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    Re: Guide to Volt-Turn Offense

    Post by Roxie on Thu Feb 02, 2012 12:25 pm

    Cool guide. Now I can learn exactly how to fair against it. Only thing I didn't see is "Hail" considering I'm a mega user of hail, I can see some downfalls to certain parts. Everything else, pretty cool.


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    quickest battle ever:

    Start of turn 1
    Gardevoir has Mega Evolved into Mega Gardevoir!
    Gardevoir used Focus Blast!
    It's super effective!
    The foe's 劈斩司令 lost 100% of its health!
    The foe's 劈斩司令 fainted!

    蓝色闪光: ⊙▽⊙
    Shadow Roxas: Noooot this time buddy
    蓝色闪光 forfeited against Shadow Roxas!

    The window was disabled due to one of the players closing the battle window.
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    Crossfire12
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    Re: Guide to Volt-Turn Offense

    Post by Crossfire12 on Thu Feb 02, 2012 12:49 pm

    Scizor and Terrakion deal with hail petty well
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    Roxie
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    Re: Guide to Volt-Turn Offense

    Post by Roxie on Thu Feb 02, 2012 1:44 pm

    But you've seen my hail team, right? It can deal with both pretty well in certain circumstances.


    __________________
    GerudoDesert
    quickest battle ever:

    Start of turn 1
    Gardevoir has Mega Evolved into Mega Gardevoir!
    Gardevoir used Focus Blast!
    It's super effective!
    The foe's 劈斩司令 lost 100% of its health!
    The foe's 劈斩司令 fainted!

    蓝色闪光: ⊙▽⊙
    Shadow Roxas: Noooot this time buddy
    蓝色闪光 forfeited against Shadow Roxas!

    The window was disabled due to one of the players closing the battle window.
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    harsha
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    Re: Guide to Volt-Turn Offense

    Post by harsha on Thu Feb 02, 2012 2:10 pm

    Err, none of your Pokemon on your hail team can adequately deal with Terrakion once it gets a sub up, which is easy to do. And Scizor's Bullet Punch doesn't help your teams case much either.
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    Re: Guide to Volt-Turn Offense

    Post by Roxie on Thu Feb 02, 2012 2:14 pm

    I did add Rotom-W, and Heatran should scare Scizor into switching (If it is set up with TormentSub).


    __________________
    GerudoDesert
    quickest battle ever:

    Start of turn 1
    Gardevoir has Mega Evolved into Mega Gardevoir!
    Gardevoir used Focus Blast!
    It's super effective!
    The foe's 劈斩司令 lost 100% of its health!
    The foe's 劈斩司令 fainted!

    蓝色闪光: ⊙▽⊙
    Shadow Roxas: Noooot this time buddy
    蓝色闪光 forfeited against Shadow Roxas!

    The window was disabled due to one of the players closing the battle window.
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    Re: Guide to Volt-Turn Offense

    Post by Hemlock on Thu Feb 02, 2012 5:49 pm

    CB Scizor Squashes Heatran with SuperPower...
    Detailed Result:
    252 Atk Choice Band Scizor Superpower vs 4 HP/0 Def Heatran: 126.54% - 149.38%
    100% chance to OHKO

    Possible HP Damage: 410, 416, 420, 424, 430, 434, 440, 444, 450, 454, 458, 464, 468, 474, 478, 484

    Rotom-C can take care of Rotom-W with Leaf Storm as long as the sp atk is at +0 or above.
    Detailed Result:
    252 SpAtk Rotom-C Leaf Storm vs 0 HP/4 SpDef Rotom-W: 169.29% - 199.17%
    100% chance to OHKO

    Possible HP Damage: 408, 411, 417, 420, 426, 432, 435, 441, 444, 450, 456, 459, 465, 468, 474, 480
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    Re: Guide to Volt-Turn Offense

    Post by Kira Light on Thu Feb 02, 2012 6:58 pm

    Ah, I see you removed Dragonite in favor of Latios. That makes sense, seeing as Dragonite was weak to Stealth Rock and you had no Rapid Spinner.

    First off, I'd recommend a change in Rotom-C's EV spread. It would now look like this: 112 EVs / 252 SAtk / 144 Spe

    Smogon University wrote:Instead of running a plain 252 / 252 spread, the given EVs are recommended for several reasons. With the given setup, Rotom hits 366 Speed, which is fast enough to outspeed positive-natured base 116s, including Whimsicott, as well as Choice Scarf Tyranitar. Everything faster than that is just too big for Rotom-C to deal with. Scarfed Heatran can't be 2HKOed with Thunderbolt, even with Stealth Rock factored in. Additionally, there aren't many opponents with a higher base Speed in standard. Aerodactyl, Jolteon, Alakazam, Weavile, and most others can be KOed by either STAB move, but it's not worth running more Speed just for them as they are just too rare.

    It will pretty much outspeed anything that is not Scarfed, and that includes Timid Starmie. Since Rotom-C will be switching a lot, it will repeatedly be hit by Stealth Rock, so having the extra bulk is really beneficial. Now, I'd recommend a Rapid Spinner just because hazards in general are a huge pain against Volt-Turn. I'd recommend adding Starmie in somewhere with this set.

    @
    Trait: Natural Cure
    EVs: 4 HP / 252 SAtk / 252 Spe
    Timid Nature (+Spe, -Atk)
    ~ Rapid Spin
    ~ Hydro Pump / Surf
    ~ Ice Beam
    ~ Thunder

    Rapid Spin clears all hazards from your side of the field. Hydro Pump's power gets increased by STAB and Rain, which is pretty cool. You can use Surf if you are afraid of the meager 20% chance of missing. Ice Beam is used to OHKO threats like Dragonite once Multiscale is broken, normally by the Stealth Rock support from Mamowsine. Thunder gets 100% accuracy in Rain, which adds to its utility for your team. It also has Natural Cure, a very useful ability. Now, here's the real question. Who to replace? Further testing would help determine that. From my point of view, I think Latios could go, since Starmie has similar moves (Thunder, Hydro Pump / Surf), while providing Rapid Spin support. It is also faster than Latios, but won't hit as hard, of course. They both belong to the Psychic type group, so the synergy won't be too big of a change. It also does a great job against Rain. It can outspeed Tornadus, who has a trolling 111 base speed stat, as opposed to Latios' 110, and then take it out with Ice Beam. Anyhow, that's up to you.

    Well, that's all for now. I'll re-take a look at your team during the weekend, when I have more time. I really like your usage of Rotom-C as a Volt-Turner. It's so underrated, but it's very effective.
    Very nice team, and good luck!




    Last edited by Kira Light on Thu Feb 02, 2012 8:33 pm; edited 2 times in total (Reason for editing : I like pie.)
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    Trinitrotoluene
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    Re: Guide to Volt-Turn Offense

    Post by Trinitrotoluene on Thu Feb 02, 2012 8:24 pm

    Intetestingly enough, Double priority SD Lucario seems problematic for your team to deal with. However, its only opportunity to set up and sweep is against your CB Scizor's Pursuit when used against Lati@s or Gengar. Your team covers it quite nicely otherwise. I have nothing else to say, so battle carefully and good luck!


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    Re: Guide to Volt-Turn Offense

    Post by harsha on Thu Feb 02, 2012 8:27 pm

    Thanks! From the looks of it, Lucario seems like a threat; I won't deny that it is. I just have to play around him with my sweepers and Volt-Turn to beat him.

    EDIT: As for Kira's rate, I'm not going to change Rotom-C's spread. That's an old analysis, and it doesn't take into account that Rotom-C outspeeds and OHKOs (broken Multiscale) Dragonite at +1. Dragonite is number 2 in usage, so I can't just ignore him. As for a spinner, there's simply no space for one without sacrificing offensive momentum. I'm unwilling to change Latios largely because it and Terrakion have done the most for this team. That being said, I'll test it out and say what I think. However, I can't think of a time that I would rather have Rapid Spin over Latios. Thanks for the rate!
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    Re: Guide to Volt-Turn Offense

    Post by harsha on Sat Feb 04, 2012 12:23 pm

    Updated.

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    Re: Guide to Volt-Turn Offense

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